On August 21 a public event entitled "Why I've been living with HIV for a long time" was held in Minsk. It was organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Belarus, with the support of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus, the United Nations Development Programme, and the Expert Council of the Information Strategy on HIV/AIDS in Belarus.

On August 21 a public event entitled "Why I've been living with HIV for a long time" was held in Minsk. It was organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Belarus, with the support of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus, the United Nations Development Programme, and the Expert Council of the Information Strategy on HIV/AIDS in Belarus. 

During the event, a billboard bearing a photo of an HIV–positive citizen was unveiled, and a performance called "Goodbye, Old Brand!" took place.

In June 2013, WHO released new recommendations, in which it calls to start the treatment of HIV infection in the early stages. Recent evidence shows that the lives of people with HIV may become longer and healthier as a result of earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the risk of transmitting HIV to others is greatly reduced. More secure and easier antiretroviral therapy offered at earlier stages can contribute to an irreversible decline in the HIV epidemic. The new recommendations are presented in the WHO document "Summary of Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for the Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection." 

The event was organized to present a summary of WHO's guidance and to support the information activities of the community of people living with HIV in Belarus. UN/UNDP representative Sanaka Samarasinha speaking at the ceremony said: "We can break down fears and build knowledge about what to do with the development of the disease. Most HIV–infected people do not seek treatment because they do not want to disclose their status.” Sanaka Samarasinha stressed that HIV–positive people should be aware that they can receive proper treatment –  a message which was addressed not only to them but to the whole of society.